Stella Creasy

Politics by People: A new charter for democratic reform

At Fabian Society New Year conference 2017
Saturday, 14 January 2017 | Friends House, 173-177 Euston Road, London, NW1 2BJ

Speakers included:

  • Stella Creasy MP (Walthamstow) – 20.08mins
  • Wayne David MP (Caerphilly) – 15.22mins
  • Katie Ghose (chief executive, Electoral Reform Society) – 5.59mins
  • Richard Angell (director, Progress) – 10.29mins
  • Deborah Mattinson (founder, Britain Thinks) – 1.50mins

A new prime minister, a new president, a new relationship with Europe… and a divided Labour party. After a tumultuous 2016, our January conference looks ahead to a critical year for the UK and asks where next for Britain, and where next for the British left? The morning will focus on the big challenges facing the left: what we believe, who we speak to, and how we win. The afternoon sessions will examine the global dilemmas we face: populism, globalisation and the age of Brexit and Trump. The conference will feature keynote speeches, panel debates and interactive delegate discussions.

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Deputy leadership interviews

… by Richard Angell and Adam Harrison

‘We need a candidate who’s not from a safe seat’ The success of ‘Fortress Exeter’ should show the way for Labour, says Ben Bradshaw

‘Don’t mourn, organise’ Labour has to start with the fundamental question of purpose, argues Stella Creasy

‘I’m not going to take any lectures’ This lioness will go out hunting for Labour’s next victory, says Caroline Flint

Finding one’s voice

Jermain Jackman: Finding one’s voice

This was first published in Progress magazine | Richard Angell and Ben Dilks The winner of The Voice on politics and pop ‘I’m still the same Jermain Jackman that you’ll see in McDonalds on a Friday afternoon getting my Big Mac meal,’ begins the winner of The Voice, before pausing to concede, ‘but it’s changed the life around me.’ The 18-year-old believes that winning the BBC’s singing competition in April ‘sent a message’ to other young people in his local community in Hackney, east London. ‘I’ve spoken to many young people, in Hackney especially, and they’ve turned their lives around because they saw how hard work has gotten me somewhere and it’s all become so real to them,’ he says. But there is nothing soft-headed about Jackman’s message. ‘Too often young people get given false hope,’ he says. ‘Politicians say, “Oh yeah, we’ll do this for young people” and then [the] EMA is scrapped, tuition fees trebled and we’re seeing youth clubs nationwide being shut down because of cuts.’ (more…)