Labour

Modernisation, values into policy, policy into action

Richard Angell opens Progress annual conference 2016

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Comrades.

Welcome to Progress annual conference – the highlight of the political calendar. Bold speakers from broad backgrounds. This year’s promises nothing less. We are honoured to be joined by not just one, but two leaders of the Labour party – Kezia Dugdale and this afternoon Jeremy Corbyn. For those worrying, I have not become a Corbynista, and Jeremy has not become a ‘formerly known as Blairite’ member of the Labour party. Today is part of a dialogue. Both leaders will inform and challenge us. It is our role to ask informed and articulate questions about where we go from here. (more…)

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Sam Delaney talks to Richard Angell about antisemitism in the Labour party

talkRADIO’s Sam Delaney talks to Richard Angell about Labour’s antisemitism problem and the Progress director’s eight point plan to tackle it.

You can lend your support to the eight point plan here: prog.rs/antisemitismaction

rhubarbTV: Head To Tozer

Episode 2 of Head To Tozer is here! Watch Ben Tozer interview the director of Progress – Labour’s progressives, Richard Angell.

About rhubarbTV

We are rhubarbTV. It’s an acronym. Royal Holloway’s Unique Broadcasting and Recording Brand. And that is exactly what we do, broadcast and record. We aim to cover an array of events both on and off campus in order for clubs and societies to reach a stronger audience with what it is that they do.

The mountain to climb: how does Labour win in the 2020s?

At the Fabian New Year Conference 2016 titled ‘Facing the Future‘ I was asked to join a panel of excellent speakers to debate and take questions on how Labour wins in 2016.

Saturday 16 January 2016, 9.15am-5pm
Institute of Education, 20 Bedford Way, London WC1H 0AL

The mountain to climb: how does Labour win in the 2020s?
Richard Angell (director, Progress), Ellie Mae O’Hagan (journalist), James Morris (partner, Greenberg Quinlan Rosner Research), Olivia Bailey (research director, Fabian Society), Chair: George Eaton (political editor, New Statesman)

Standing by the values of the co-operative movement

A joint letter to the Guardian

Watching the agonies of the Co-operative Group has been hard for those us who want to see fundamental change in the way our economy and wider society is run, and believe the co-operative movement has a lot of the answers (Report, 21 April). For almost 100 years the labour movement and co-operative movement have worked together through our respective political parties to achieve progressive social change. The electoral agreement signed by the Labour party and the Co-operative party in 1927 has ensured the co-operative movement has a strong voice in parliament and within the Labour family. (more…)

‘The country will be run according to a different idea’

First published in Progress magazine

There will be no pie-in-the-sky promises under the next Labour government, Ed Miliband tells Richard Angell and Adam Harrison

Entering the leader of the opposition’s now-bare office, his team are quick to point out how the operation has decamped to Brewers Green, the campaign nerve centre. In what is one of Ed Miliband’s last meetings in the Norman Shaw South office we ask him to cast his mind forward. What will Britain after five years of a Labour government look like? ‘The country will be run according to a different idea,’ he explains. ‘I think the Tories really do believe that as long as you take care of those at the top, the wealth will just trickle down to everybody else. That has not worked.’ So Labour, in contrast, believes ‘when working people succeed, that Britain succeeds’. ‘At the end of five years of this government, people think the country is more divided, more unequal, more unjust. And I hope that by the end of five years of my government, people will think, “Actually the country is more fair, more just, more equal and better serves my interests”.’ (more…)

Nice to feel wanted

First published in Progress magazine

English marginals need real attention

During the course of a campaign that ran at full speed for longer than can reasonably be expected, Better Together mobilised members of both the frontbench and the backbenches of Labour’s Westminster and Holyrood teams in the effort to save the union. Both the official ‘No’ campaign and the Labour party pulled in resources to combat the nationalists. In the last few months organisers were moved from southern English target seats as far away as Plymouth, key campaigners were moved from English and Welsh marginals and in the last week of the campaign regional offices across the country upped sticks and were out knocking doors for our Scottish cousins. Indeed, from Hogmanay onwards I was the lucky recipient of increasingly panicked texts and emails about venturing north to help the Better Together campaign.

This was no doubt the right thing to do but it does prompt several avenues of questioning. (more…)

Time for NEC reform to strengthen members’ and councillors’ voices

First published on Progressonline

The events of last weekend were historic and unifying. The changes will be meaningful and, let us hope, lasting. Giving 2.7 million trade unionists the chance to step closer to the party their forebears helped create is no small thing. And asking the nine million people who stayed loyal in 2010 when the party got the second-worst electoral thumping since 1918 should chart a new opportunity for the people’s party. All make it more likely we win the coming general election.

Missing from the reform package, and Refounding Labour before it, is the necessary changes to the committee that is now to implement the Collins proposals, the NEC. (more…)

Debate: The Coalition Government Has Failed

A debate organised by KCL Politics Society and New Turn, in partnership with KCL Conservative Society and KCL Labour Society. Under the title ‘Have the coalition failed?’ the event took place 6.30pm on 22 October 2013 in room B5, Franklin Wilkins building, Waterloo.

Proposition: Richard Angell, former national chair of Young Labour, and Sam Coates, out-going co-chair of the Young Greens.

Opposition: Oliver Cooper, chairman of Conservative Futures, and Joshua Dixon, executive committee of Liberal Youth.

* It is worth noting that the event was only an all-male panel due to sickness of one of the speakers on the day