Labour

Whither Labour?

Can Labour win again asks Richard Angell and Maya Goodfellow

The Speakers’ Corner Trust hosts Progress director Richard Angell and LabourList columnist Maya Goodfellow debating the challenges facing Labour and the way forward.

Follow the debate now: http://www.speakerscornertrust.org/10642/whither-labour/

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Is the mainstream media biased against Corbyn? (Daily Politics, 28 September 2016)

Looking at broadcasters and print coverage of Labour and Jeremy Corbyn with director of the centrist Labour group Progress, Richard Angell, and US-based Bhaskar Sunkara, who founded the Jacobin magazine, which offers “socialist perspectives on politics, economics, and culture”.


Daily Politics with Andrew Neil
1.30pm, 28 September 2016

We call on Labour to pledge to end homelessness

A joint letter to the Guardian

A year ago, we launched LCEH to ask the Labour Party to include, in its next manifesto, a pledge to end homelessness – something it has never before done. This is not a pipe dream. Leading homelessness charities such as Crisis and Shelter believe that we can end homelessness too. Yet we believe also that only the Labour Party can deliver on this in government. (more…)

Remembering Jo Cox

First published on ProgressOnline

You don’t have to be close to a star to know it shines bright. Jo Cox was a star in Labour’s bleak sky. Her personality bubbled, her generosity was unending, she was a loving wife and brilliant mother. Her slight and five-foot-nothing figure contained a giant in the making. She spoke in the chamber with authority, with her colleagues in a spirit of collaboration, and with Labour supporters in a way they could connect with.

I judge my politicians on this standard: do they say things I wish I had thought first? Jo never disappointed. I know her colleagues and constituents agree. There is a tendency from some – new MPs included – to keep your head down and go with the flow. As she spoke on Syria, women’s rights and for her constituents, Jo did nothing of the sort. Instead she led her colleagues in debate and laughed with them in the bars. This combination of brilliance and generosity is why she got so much done in just 405 days in parliament; rarely alone but in coalitions, Jo so often leading the pack. (more…)