growing membership

Whither Labour?

Can Labour win again asks Richard Angell and Maya Goodfellow

The Speakers’ Corner Trust hosts Progress director Richard Angell and LabourList columnist Maya Goodfellow debating the challenges facing Labour and the way forward.

Follow the debate now: http://www.speakerscornertrust.org/10642/whither-labour/

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Labour and entryism (Sky News, 14 August 2016)

Sky News’ Tom McLeod talks to Richard Angell about Tom Watson’s concerns about entryism in the Labour party (see: http://www.theguardian.com/politics/2016/aug/10/tom-watson-sends-corbyn-proof-of-trotskyist-labour-infiltration).

The week the mods got organised

First published on Progressonline

They said it couldn’t be done, that moderate Labour supporters could never be persuaded to pay £25 for a vote in the leadership election. But this week, from a standing start, Saving Labour – and all those who fell in behind – galvanised the moderate wing of the Labour party and recruited a historic number of Labour voters to the party fold. 183,000 people used the party’s fledgling Registered Supporters scheme to get a vote in the forthcoming leadership election. Reports suggest that between 34 and 40 per cent are those wanting a credible opposition. More than anyone could have hoped for if the number got into six figures. And that was well before reports of 40,000 duplications – much more likely to be Jeremy Corbyn voters – were deducted from that number. (more…)

Strong words, softly spoken

First published in Progress magazine

John Hannett is general secretary of Usdaw

Grown-up trade unionism delivers for workers, argues John Hannett in consersation with Richard Angell and Adam Harrison

As leader of one of the few trade unions increasing its membership, John Hannett is a man worth listening to. Usdaw has added 110,000 members to its ranks over the last decade, bucking the trend for union membership. This is all the more impressive for a union that represents members in shops, factories and warehouses that have struggled in the grip of recession – including those working in the 807 Woolworths stores that were forced to close in 2009. (more…)