economy

Hammond must face the future

First published on ProgressOnline

Tomorrow is the autumn statement. It is the first economic intervention by the new chancellor since Britain’s decision to leave the European Union. But this is not the statement of a new government. This is the sixth year of this Tory government. What is unclear is if it is George Osborne’s apprentice or outrider that will be delivering the statement in the House of Commons at 12.30pm. There is little now that Philip Hammond can blame on the last Labour government. What he inherits is from Osborne, not Gordon Brown or Alistair Darling.

The sad reality is Britain goes into Brexit in a less than perfect state. The shock still to come to the economy means the fiscal framework will not be met pre, during nor post Article 50 being concluded. Britain’s ability to weather the storm to come is not what it should be. It might not all be of the Tories making, but they have hardly left us in the best place to go it alone. (more…)

An unrest being fuelled not quelled

First published on ProgressOnline

It all feels very personal. It is not that I cannot believe it or that I hate my fellow country-folk. But I do worry about what our country is becoming. Leaving the European Union is a body blow to Britain, as we are seeing in the markets. I respect the decision but think it was a very wrong one for everyone.

On the tube this morning a group of friends were talking about Brexit, Boris and Trump in the same worrying breath. A mixed race guy told his friend that he ‘felt like an illegal immigrant in his own country’. The first cross word I have ever had with my grandma was over this divisive referendum and Facebook seems full of families arguing about who took what side. There is an unrest in the air that this decision is fuelling not quelling. (more…)

Bedtime: Time to put the last Labour government to bed

Bedtime

Kitty Ussher, Jacqui Smith, Anne Begg, Stephen Twigg and Mike Gapes assess how Labour did. Richard Angell explains the motivation for this new assessment, and argues that the last Labour government should be the inspiration to be in government again – not the inspiration for the next government.

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Introduction Time to put the last Labour government to bed Bedtime it might be, but only so the Labour movement can awaken as a party of government again, writes Richard Angell

The mantle of credibility Trust in Labour on the economy was hard won, deserved, then needlessly lost, suggests Kitty Ussher

The bedrock of social justice Labour rejected the fatalistic assumption that public services could never really deliver higher standards or fairer access, reflects Jacqui Smith

The escape from poverty Labour made strong progress in the battle against poverty and unemployment, finds Anne Begg

Equality for all We must not forget the equalities legislation passed under the Labour government, writes Stephen Twigg

A more progressive world The new Labour government in 1997 was immediately internationalist in its approach, recalls Mike Gapes

Conclusion Principled and proud The last Labour government should be the inspiration to be in government again, not the inspiration for the next government, argues Richard Angell

Why It’s Time to Put the Last Labour Government to Bed

First published on the Huffington Post

BedtimeBeing backward-looking is a curse in politics. We need to know our history, so that we do not repeat the wrong bits. But pining for a bygone era, or looking to recreate something that has been and gone, never works. Worse still it stops you being able to shape the future. As centre-left people who want a Labour government, this is our task.

Today, at the Labour pressure group Progress where I am director, we launch Bedtime our stocktake of the record of the 1997-2010 government. It takes an audit of those thirteen years across five big areas of public policy: the economy, pubic services, welfare, equalities and human rights and foreign policy. We do this not to harp on about bygone days, but to help put those days firmly behind the Labour party – and to play our part in helping it move on. To put behind us, the inheritors to the party’s modernising tradition, once and for all, the idea that we are simply looking to pick up where Tony Blair left off in 2007 or Gordon Brown left off in 2010. (more…)

Corbynomics and the magic money trees

First published on Progressonline

The spending side of Corbynomics – set out in his manifesto The Economy in 2020 – with its promises of renationalisation of the railways, the energy companies and even the banking and financial services sectors, has received deserved scrutiny. Less so the question where the money to fund it has come from.

Such attention as there has been has focused on so-called ‘people’s quantitative easing’ which Robert Peston identified as carrying the possibility of ‘devastatingly inflationary consequences’ in a hardhitting blogpost of yesterday. (more…)

‘The best antidote to anti-politics is grown-up politics’

First published in Progress magazine

Labour needs to be at the heart of a broad campaign to stay in Europe, Chuka Umunna tells Richard Angell and Adam Harrison

Thought by many to be one of the strongest contenders for the Labour leadership election, it was a surprise when Chuka Umunna withdrew from the contest. Now out of the glare of the spotlight, we took time to catch up with Labour’s shadow secretary of state for business after arguably Labour’s worst defeat. (more…)

What are the first year challenges for a UK Labour government and how does it over come them?

5.30pm, Saturday 14 February 2015 | Brangwyn Hall, Swansea, SA1 4PE

Owen Smith MP Shadow secretary of state for Wales
Ann Jones AM Chair, children, young people and education committee
Richard Angell 
Director, Progress
Mary Wimbury Parliamentary candidate for Aberconwy
Chair: John Bayliss Chief whip, Swansea council

Debate: The Coalition Government Has Failed

A debate organised by KCL Politics Society and New Turn, in partnership with KCL Conservative Society and KCL Labour Society. Under the title ‘Have the coalition failed?’ the event took place 6.30pm on 22 October 2013 in room B5, Franklin Wilkins building, Waterloo.

Proposition: Richard Angell, former national chair of Young Labour, and Sam Coates, out-going co-chair of the Young Greens.

Opposition: Oliver Cooper, chairman of Conservative Futures, and Joshua Dixon, executive committee of Liberal Youth.

* It is worth noting that the event was only an all-male panel due to sickness of one of the speakers on the day