Pamphlet

From time-to-time Richard Angell takes part in the publication of a pamphlet

Bedtime: Time to put the last Labour government to bed

Bedtime

Kitty Ussher, Jacqui Smith, Anne Begg, Stephen Twigg and Mike Gapes assess how Labour did. Richard Angell explains the motivation for this new assessment, and argues that the last Labour government should be the inspiration to be in government again – not the inspiration for the next government.

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Introduction Time to put the last Labour government to bed Bedtime it might be, but only so the Labour movement can awaken as a party of government again, writes Richard Angell

The mantle of credibility Trust in Labour on the economy was hard won, deserved, then needlessly lost, suggests Kitty Ussher

The bedrock of social justice Labour rejected the fatalistic assumption that public services could never really deliver higher standards or fairer access, reflects Jacqui Smith

The escape from poverty Labour made strong progress in the battle against poverty and unemployment, finds Anne Begg

Equality for all We must not forget the equalities legislation passed under the Labour government, writes Stephen Twigg

A more progressive world The new Labour government in 1997 was immediately internationalist in its approach, recalls Mike Gapes

Conclusion Principled and proud The last Labour government should be the inspiration to be in government again, not the inspiration for the next government, argues Richard Angell

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Face-Off: Who Will Labour’s Next Opponent

‘Now it’s open war’, screamed the Daily Mail headline on 18 June 2015. Not, this time, a comment on the Labour leadership race that was then getting into full swing, but the contest to come on the Treasury benches. The future race to be leader of the Conservative party, a vacancy David Cameron himself pre-announced in his kitchen interview with the BBC’s James Landale earlier this year, might have slipped from the public eye temporarily, but the unrest that characterised the Conservative parliamentary party in the last parliament has not gone away.

In this new pamphlet, a leading cast of Labour commentators examine the names in the Tory frame and assess their chances.

Face-off front coverContents

II Introduction Parties at war – by Richard Angell and Adam Harrison

III George Osborne Politics first, economics second – by Conor Pope
IV Theresa May Neither ‘blue’ nor ‘Bullingdon’ – by Jacqui Smith
Boris Johnson A real laugh – by Sally Gimson
VI Sajid Javid Break the mould – by Felicity Slater
VII Amber Rudd Thatcher’s heir – by Ben Dilks
VIII David Cameron Always underestimated – by Jonathan Todd

XI Conclusion Osborne’s to lose? – by Richard Angell and Adam Harrison

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See the full pamphlet with all the potential leaders profiled here

Ambitions for Britain’s Future

Ambitions_For_Britains_Future_Page_01

First published on Young Fabian website 

On Monday 21 November 2011 the Young Fabian flagship pamphlet, “Ambitions for Britain’s Future” was launched by Rt Hon Liam Bryne MP, Brian Duggan, Sara Ibrahim and Mark Protherough (ICAEW) at the Chartered Accountants Hall, London.

This pamphlet is the culmination of a policy process involving hundreds of Young Fabian members and set out new ideas for Labour to champion. These policy initiatives are being offered amidst a difficult fiscal climate and so it is all the more important for politics and for Young Fabians to be ambitious for Britain’s future. (more…)